StoneSprings Hospital - July 11, 2016


You’ve just had the most amazing birthing experience – good food, a comfortable private room, and the softest pillows you’ve ever laid your head on. It's finally time to bring baby home, and you couldn’t be more excited.

Then you’re home. The visitors taper off and your family gets into its new routine. You may have plenty of helpers and previous experience (and everyone will be more than happy to give you advice – whether you ask for it or not), but there will still be times you are left scratching your head.

It’s perfectly normal. New babies bring up all sorts of questions, anxieties and self-doubt. That’s why you need to line up these three indispensible resources to get you through:

Lactation Consultant

Lactation consultants can help you troubleshoot anything – from a solid latch to finding a comfortable hold. Research shows that mothers who are supported in the early stages of the breastfeeding process have a greater feeling of success and are able to feed longer.

If you choose not to breastfeed, or if breastfeeding is not possible, lactation consultants can even provide advice on how to properly bottle feed and prepare formula.

Babysitter

Hear us out. We know the thought of leaving your newborn at home while you do something non-baby related may be daunting, but it’s the single most important thing you can do.

With so much going on, you may not be able to satisfy everyone’s needs. Getting the “baby blues” is common and postpartum depression occurs in nearly 15% of births. While there’s no single cause, both physical and emotional issues may play a role.

Have a trusted person on-call for needed breaks – or better yet, schedule regular time for yourself! Focusing on your needs will help you better care for the health and wellness of your baby.

Support Group

Okay, so technically this is not one person but that’s what makes this resource even better. Sometimes you just need to vent or just pick someone’s mind. Being a mom to a new baby is hard enough without having to worry about what others are thinking.